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By bishopdonmiguel
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#4825785
Nicely done. How do you plan to cut that mouse hole?
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By CPU64
Supporting Member
#4825898
Easiest way is using a hole saw first, then use a regular jigsaw to cut the sides out..

Also, while you're at this part, I'd recommend adding a lock washer before the nut on the alice mounts. Or use a nylon lock nut. They can loosen up after wearing the pack for sometime.
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By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4825946
Agree on cutting an undersized hole first. I'd slowly & carefully hand cut the sides using a fine-tooth hacksaw blade. Once you have a rough opening, use a Dremel with a sandpaper drum and slowly open the space until the clamp fits. You'll need to make some minor adjustments once you get the clamp mounted to the mobo to ensure that the parts don't bind.

Looking forward to seeing your progress.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826225
Nicely done. How do you plan to cut that mouse hole?
Thanks, Bishop! I always thought the method you described in your thread (and down below ;)) sounded like a good way to go. I like the idea of drilling an undersized hole, cutting the lines straight down and then slowly expanding the size for a good fit.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826226
Easiest way is using a hole saw first, then use a regular jigsaw to cut the sides out..
Also, while you're at this part, I'd recommend adding a lock washer before the nut on the alice mounts. Or use a nylon lock nut. They can loosen up after wearing the pack for sometime.
Those hole saws look pretty scary with the huge, jagged teeth :twisted: LOL. Would gel coat chipping be a concern with one of those?

Thanks for the tip on the lock washers. I picked up some nylon lock nuts when I got the other hardware and will use them for final assembly.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826227
Agree on cutting an undersized hole first. I'd slowly & carefully hand cut the sides using a fine-tooth hacksaw blade. Once you have a rough opening, use a Dremel with a sandpaper drum and slowly open the space until the clamp fits. You'll need to make some minor adjustments once you get the clamp mounted to the mobo to ensure that the parts don't bind.
Looking forward to seeing your progress.
For the undersized hole, I'm thinking either a step-bit, or a forstner bit. But I have the same concerns with using a slightly undersized forstner bit, as I do the hole saw... the gelcoat.

I keep thinking I should offer to buy someone's removed fiberglass N-Filter and go to town trying different types of bits.

The hacksaw blade seems like it would work a charm. A jigsaw might offer more control, but I would have to pick one up.

Will defiantly be going the "use a Dremel with a sandpaper drum and slowly open the space until the clamp fits" route and thanks for the tip for avoiding the parts binding!
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By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4826230
Step bit works great but mine maxed out at 1/2-inch as I recall so there was some manual effort... but your template should make that easy. The saw blade allowed for complete control of the bite and the speed so i didn't experience cracking... but I went very slow. Whatever extra is left, fear not, the Dremel sand drum eats through the fiberglass so opening it up is painless.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826417
Switching gears a little bit, I was able to find a proper LC-1 kidney pad and was pleased to find out my order also included the waist strap. I already had the strap with plastic latches, so getting the metal latch version was a nice bonus and it was interesting to see to differences in the latch...
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Left - plastic, Right - Metal

Here they are installed...
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Another step closer :-D
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826420
Step bit works great but mine maxed out at 1/2-inch as I recall so there was some manual effort... but your template should make that easy.
After marking off the area to remove with my template, I was able to get a 3/4" hole drilled with the step bit. Using a slow to medium speed worked great...
Image
Whatever extra is left, fear not, the Dremel sand drum eats through the fiberglass so opening it up is painless.
Cool. Anticipating a lot fiberglass dust, so I will certainly wear a respirator for this step and maybe even perform it outside :whatever: My plan is to open up the hole with the dremel first, leaving the straight lines alone. Then get those with the hack saw.
The saw blade allowed for complete control of the bite and the speed so i didn't experience cracking... but I went very slow..
Sounds good. I'll give the hacksaw method a shot after expanding the hole. Thanks, Bishop!
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4826439
I'll give the hacksaw method a shot after expanding the hole.
I'd suggest you cut those straight lines with the hacksaw before opening up the hole... OR skip the hacksaw entirely and just use the Dremel to shape it. If you remove too much supporting material, the saw may wobble.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826827
I'd suggest you cut those straight lines with the hacksaw before opening up the hole... OR skip the hacksaw entirely and just use the Dremel to shape it. If you remove too much supporting material, the saw may wobble.
Great advice there, Bishop. Thanks! I tried the hacksaw before opening up the hole, but quickly switched over using just the Dremel and found it to be quicker and easier. More details below...
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4826834
As mentioned above, drilling the 3/4 hole with the step bit, then shaping the rest of the mouse hole with the Dremel sanding barrel bit worked great. After drilling the hole, I opened it up to the inside edge of the template line, then slowly opened it up further until it slid over the clamp without binding.


Next, I traced the location of the clamp on the motherboard and marked the drill points with a center punch...
Image


Holes drilled and motherboard cleaned up...
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Clamp attached...
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Like others, I had an overlap with the clamp screw and the large head rivet, so I replaced the rivet with "dadoed" extra I had...
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One little surprise I had was that the other clamp screw just barely interferes with the one of the lower frame spacers...
Image


I'm betting this was mentioned by someone else and I must have missed it. No worries, though. It's an easy fix and well worth it for the such a nice Wire Loom Clamp...
Image
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4826837
That looks great! p.s. I had precisely the same problem with the frame spacer.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4827088
I felt it was time to actually attach something to the shell, and the Clippard 331 seemed like a good choice. I started out by marking a center line across the mounting point, then marked off a line at 45 degrees to show the location of the post nub...

Image

Next, I used a step bit to drill the center hole to 3/8", then switched to the Dremel with a carbide tip to make the little notch at the 45 degree mark...

Image

After confirming the Clippard fit well and lined up with the center line, I marked the screw hole locations. Finally, I drilled and tapped for the 8-32 cap heads and installed...

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It's firmly attached, but I should probably add some washers and nuts under the shell...

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Next up is either the Crank Knob or the V-Hook mount... decisions, decisions...
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4827325
Ran into a small snag in my plans to mount the Crank Knob. I have a potentiometer with 1/4" of thread and a 1/4" thick shell at the mounting point...

Image

There seems to be a couple of options here...

1) Thin out the shell from the back by about a 1/8"
or
2) Find a potentiometer with a longer threaded section

I'm leaning toward thinning out the shell, but if someone has a recommendation for a pot with a longer thread, I'd certainly try going that route first.
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4827340
There seems to be a couple of options here...

1) Thin out the shell from the back by about a 1/8"
or
2) Find a potentiometer with a longer threaded section

I'm leaning toward thinning out the shell, but if someone has a recommendation for a pot with a longer thread, I'd certainly try going that route first.
You also might consider countersinking the nut on the front side using a Dremel. Not screen accurate but I preferred the cleaner look for a part that no one will ever see. :wink:
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4827374
You also might consider countersinking the nut on the front side using a Dremel. Not screen accurate but I preferred the cleaner look for a part that no one will ever see. :wink:
Doh! Looking again at the picture in your build thread, I can now see that's what you did :)

I don't have a drill press, but a forstner bit seem like a good choice, but since I already have a hole there, keeping it centered by hand might be tricky :whatever:

Thanks for the guidance, Bishop!
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4827520
While thinking about the best way to counter-sink my crank knob mount hole, I got this done...

Image

Finished without a hitch. Gotta enjoy that when it happens! My Milwaukee 1/2" step bit cut through the pre-marked spots on the N-Filter like butter. For the holes facing up, I was able to just flip the drill over. Happy day!
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By Venkman's Swagger
#4827575
Extremely accurate work there GT. Looks great. You're highlighting what can be achieved with a steady methodical approach. Well done dude
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By GohstTarp
Supporting Member
#4827779
Thanks, VS and Nick-A-Tron! The kind words are much appreciated :cool:

Was recently able to counter-sink the Crank Knob mounting hole so that I could expose some of the pot shaft's thread...

Image

Unfortunately, that was not the end of the story. The inside of the shell wasn't flat where the pot sat, so the post was all wonky and crooked. To fix that, I flattened out the (inside) shell at that point with a forstner bit. Now the pot set flat, the shaft was straight, and the Crank Know could be mounted nicely...

Image

Image

Now I have a fully spinning Crank Knob to be proud of.

Many thanks to bishopdonmiguel for the idea to use a potentiometer with the stop removed for total spinning action!
Last edited by GohstTarp on April 16th, 2018, 6:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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By bishopdonmiguel
Supporting Member
#4827781
That's a mighty fine crank knob you're sporting there! Wish I was rocking grey on my pack.
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